Holy Apostles Orthodox Church
345 Ridge Rd, Lansing, NY
Orthodox Church in America
Prayer List

Listed here are the names of these whom we have been asked to pray for, both living and reposed.  If you would like to add a name to the list, please email them to office@HolyApostlesLansing.org.

Living

Apr Patrick
Hmk Seraphim
Mat Rebekah
Jim
Paul
Jen
Gina
Clyde
Debbie
Kevin
Barbara
Carol
Gaetan
Adeline
Celine
James
Joshua
Brittany
Janet
Gretchen
Daniel
Gregory
Kim
Jim
Robert
Debra
Kim
Dominic
Victoria
Chazz
Julia
Katherine
Fulton
Logan



Prayer

"He who is able to pray correctly, even if he is the poorest of all people, is essentially the richest. And he who does not have proper prayer, is the poorest of all, even if he sits on a royal throne."  - St John Chrysostom

Prayer is the elevation of the mind and the heart to God in praise, in thanksgiving, and in petition for the spiritual and material goods we need.  Our Lord Jesus Christ commanded us to enter into our inner room and there pray to God the Father in secret. This inner room means the heart, the core of our being.  

The Apostle Paul says that we must always pray in our spirit.  He commands prayer for all Christians without exception and asks us to pray unceasingly.

Orthodox Christians engage in both corporate and personal prayer.  One’s individual prayer life is balanced with participation in the liturgical services of the Church where the whole community gathers for prayer and worship.

For more on prayer, go to this link.
Reposed

Robert
Harold
Matthew
Tom
Lillian
Stanley
Helen
Harold
Walter
Martha
John
Rosalie
Lillian
Gregory
Myron
Mary
Mildred
Anna
Anne
Samuel
James
Carmine
Joan
Elizabeth
Leland
Cathy
Laura
Herman
Gennady
Alexander
Newly Reposed:
Apr John
Apr Vadim
Dorothy
Michael
Lynne
Virginia
Kenneth




Praying for the Dead

The question has often been asked: "I am interested in what I understand to be an Orthodox tradition/custom of prayers, etc. on anniversaries of the death of a loved one. Any information would be very much appreciated."

Fr John Matusiak answers: "While there are a number of variations depending on place and time, in general prayers for the departed are offered immediately upon the death of an Orthodox Christian:

       There is a special Rite for the Parting of the Soul from the Body which may be celebrated at the moment of death.

       During the period of time between the actual death and burial: Special services for the departed, variously known as the “Panikhida,” “Parastas,” “Pomen,” “Mnemosyno,” etc. are celebrated as the time of the Funeral Service approaches. In some traditions the Divine Liturgy is also celebrated on the morning of burial, in which case the Funeral Service is often celebrated the preceding night. A brief “Panikhida,” sometimes called a “Litiya,” is celebrated at the burial site, followed the prayers for the “sealing” of the grave.

For the rest of the answer, go to this link.